Authors: An, XM; Li, JC; Ma, GW

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An, XM, Li, JC & Ma, GW 2008, 'Vibrating Screen Modelling with the Numerical Manifold Method', in Y Potvin, J Carter, A Dyskin & R Jeffrey (eds), Proceedings of the First Southern Hemisphere International Rock Mechanics Symposium, Australian Centre for Geomechanics, Perth, pp. 205-214.

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Abstract:
The numerical manifold method (NMM) is a newly developed computational approach, which treats both continuous and discontinuous problems in a unified framework. Its mathematical mesh does not need to conform to the problem domain, similar to that used in the extended finite element method (XFEM) and the generalised finite element method (GFEM), which greatly simplifies the meshing task. A simplex integration method is adopted in the NMM to evaluate the integrals over arbitrary manifold elements, which avoids the tedious procedure of element partitioning in the XFEM and the jagged pixel approximation in the GFEM for the numerical integration over the elements intersected by discontinuities. In addition, the implemented contact model guarantees the contact requirement of no tension and no penetration between individual blocks. In this paper, the NMM is applied to the simulation of vibrating screen. The vibrating screen is widely used in mining, construction material, transportation, energy and chemical industry for size separation. The efficiency of the screen is determined by the size and the shape of the screen openings, the amplitude and the frequency of the screen motion. In the present paper, the size separation process by vibrating screen is numerically simulated by using the NMM with a simplified numerical model. Numerical results show that the NMM can be potentially useful for the vibrating screen problem. It helps us understand the fundamental mechanisms of this process and offers us valuable information on improving the design of the equipment to achieve better efficiency.

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