Authors: McIlveen, G; Mulligan, DR; Baumgartl, T; Edraki, M; Pudmenzky, A; Rossato, L

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McIlveen, G, Mulligan, DR, Baumgartl, T, Edraki, M, Pudmenzky, A & Rossato, L 2008, 'Mine Closure to Relinquishment — The Development of Partnerships and Management Tools to Support the Process', in AB Fourie, M Tibbett, I Weiersbye & P Dye (eds), Proceedings of the Third International Seminar on Mine Closure, Australian Centre for Geomechanics, Perth, pp. 207-214.

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Abstract:
As a mine is closed, the management process is highly likely to be required to support on-going site management and reporting to stakeholders and regulators, for decades afterwards. It is essential, therefore, to ensure the maintenance of corporate memory by retaining essential site data. This site data will provide the foundation for the research science that may be needed to provide confidence on residual risk to regulators in order to gain relinquishment. Partnerships between tertiary institutions and corporations holding the mine sites provide one mechanism to achieve long-term stewardship of site information essential to meet regulatory requirements and support research to fill gaps in knowledge of site-specific natural systems and rehabilitation performance. A set of management system tools has been developed to manage and utilize the wide range of data, reports and images remaining at a number of closed mines, in partnership with the organizations ultimately responsible for the closed sites. This includes purpose-built software that combines accurate and to-scale three-dimensional photo images and scientific software to hold, display and interpret the wide range of environmental data at each site.

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