Authors: Baker, AJM


DOI https://doi.org/10.36487/ACG_repo/908_Baker

Cite As:
Baker, AJM 2009, 'A Darwinian approach to mine closure and restoration', in AB Fourie & M Tibbett (eds), Mine Closure 2009: Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Mine Closure, Australian Centre for Geomechanics, Perth, pp. 21-23, https://doi.org/10.36487/ACG_repo/908_Baker

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Abstract:
Mineral wastes, particularly those from ancient metalliferous operations, provide an evolutionary theatre where the long-term impacts of natural selection can be observed on organisms able to colonise an environment where few species can survive. Darwin’s vision of ‘survival of the fittest’ applies dramatically in such extreme environments where metal toxicities may be powerful and clear-cut. Plant materials selected from these sites provide a wealth of pre-adapted genotypes for exploitation in mine site rehabilitation and ecosystem restoration.



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