Authors: Paulka, SM

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DOI https://doi.org/10.36487/ACG_repo/2215_47

Cite As:
Paulka, SM 2022, 'Ranger Mine: closing a uranium mine surrounded by a World Heritage listed national park', in AB Fourie, M Tibbett & G Boggs (eds), Mine Closure 2022: 15th International Conference on Mine Closure, Australian Centre for Geomechanics, Perth, pp. 661-668, https://doi.org/10.36487/ACG_repo/2215_47

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Abstract:
Energy Resources of Australia Ltd (ERA) has owned and operated the Ranger uranium mine since the commencement of operations in 1980. Ranger has been one of Australia's major uranium mines, producing in excess of 132,000 tonnes of uranium oxide over 40 years, one of only three mines globally to do this. Operations at Ranger ceased on 8 January 2021, with the focus of activities now on final rehabilitation and closure. The mine is surrounded by, but is not part of, the World Heritage listed Kakadu National Park. ERA’s rehabilitation strategy has been developed following extensive scientific research, engineering design and stakeholder consultation over the past 30 years. The basis of the strategy is to ensure the surrounding environment will remain protected after closure, as it has been for the entire 40 years of operations, and that rehabilitation of Ranger is to a standard such that it could be incorporated into Kakadu. This paper discusses the studies and plans associated with tailings management, geomorphic landform design, landscape evolution modelling, cultural reconnection, and revegetation with locally collected native species that underpin this strategy.

Keywords: uranium mine rehabilitation, landform design, revegetation, in-pit tailings disposal, cultural reconnection

References:
Atomic Energy Act 1953, Commonwealth of Australia.
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ERA 2020, Ranger Mine Closure Plan, Energy Resources of Australia, Darwin, viewed 10 December 2020,
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Iles, M &Rissik, D 2022, ‘Risk based contaminant management: Ranger case study’, in M Tibbett, AB Fourie & G Boggs (eds), Mine Closure 2022: Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Mine Closure, Australian Centre for Geomechanics, Perth,
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UNESCO 2019. Kakadu National Park, UNEWSCO World Heritage Convention, viewed 12 September 2020,




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